LGBT Sexual Health
Sign In

Patient Care

 LGBT Sexual Health

 LGBT Sexual Health

Femaledoctor.png​​​​​​​

Gays & Bisexual Men

Gay and bisexual men, like all men, need to be aware of the ways they can protect their health through all stages of life. Among men who have sex with men (MSM), there are higher rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). Getting tested for HIV and STIs is a first step in protecting your health. Knowing you are infected allows you to get the care that you need to stay healthy and take steps to protect your partners.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF A SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTION?

Most sexually transmitted infections do not have any signs or symptoms. But when they do appear, they can be:

  • Discharge from penis
  • Sores, blisters, growths or ulcers on genital areas
  • Rashes in the genital or anal area
  • Fever, swollen glands, flu-like illness, body rash or unexplained weight loss
  • Pain when passing urine or irritation inside the tip of the penis
  • Discharge or pain in the rectum

WHAT TESTS ARE RECOMMENDED FOR GAYS AND BISEXUAL MEN?

  • HIV (once a year)
  • Syphilis
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • Genital Herpes
  • Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea testing of throat (if you had receptive oral sex in the past year)
  • Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea testing of penis (if you had insertive sex or oral sex in the past year)
  • Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea testing of rectum (if you had receptive anal sex in the past year)

You may wish to test more often (3 - 6 monthly) if you have multiple or anonymous sexual partners, have sex together with drug use or have sex with sexual partners that participate in these activities.

WHAT VACCINATIONS ARE RECOMMENDED?

  • Hepatitis B
  • HPV Vaccination for males aged 9 - 26 years old
Please refer here for more information on vaccinations offered by the DSC Clinic.

HOW DO I PROTECT MYSELF FROM SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS AND HIV?

  • Don’t have oral, vaginal or anal sex.
  • Be in a long term, mutually exclusive sexual relationship.
  • Use a condom every time you have oral, vaginal or anal sex.
  • Avoid sharing sex toys.
  • Be honest and open with your doctor about your sexual behavior so they can provide you with the best and most appropriate care.
 

Lesbians & Bisexual Women

Lesbians and bisexual women, like all women, need to be aware of the ways they can protect their health through all stages of life. Getting tested for HIV and STIs is a first step in protecting your health. Knowing you are infected allows you to get the care that you need to stay healthy and take steps to protect your partners.

Transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among WSW

Women who have sex with women (WSW) are at risk for STIs. Lesbians and bisexual women can transmit STIs to each other through:

  • Skin-to-skin contact
  • Mucosa contact (e.g. mouth to vagina)
  • Vaginal fluids
  • Menstrual blood
  • Sharing sex toys
 


WHAT ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF A SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTION?

Most sexually transmitted infections do not have any signs or symptoms. But when they do appear, they can be:

  • Discharge from vagina
  • Sores, blisters, growths or ulcers on genital areas
  • Rashes on palms or bottom of feet
  • Lower abdominal pain
  • Pain during sex or when passing urine

WHAT TESTS ARE RECOMMENDED FOR LESBIANS AND BISEXUAL WOMEN?

  • HIV (once a year)
  • Chlamydia
  • Pap Smear
  • Syphilis
  • Hepatitis B
  • Trichomoniasis
  • Bacterial Vaginosis
  • HPV test
  • Gonorrhoea

You may wish to test more often (3 - 6 monthly) if you have multiple or anonymous sexual partners, have sex together with drug use or have sex with sexual partners that participate in these activities.

WHAT VACCINATIONS ARE RECOMMENDED?

  • Hepatitis B
  • HPV vaccination for females aged 9 - 26 years old
Please refer here for more information on vaccinations offered by the DSC Clinic.

HOW DO I PROTECT MYSELF FROM SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS AND HIV?

  • Don’t have oral, vaginal or anal sex
  • Be in a long term, mutually exclusive sexual relationship.
  • Use a condom every time you have oral, vaginal or anal sex.
  • Avoid sharing sex toys.
  • Be honest and open with your doctor about your sexual behavior so they can provide you with the best and most appropriate care.
 

Transgender Persons

Both transgender males and females need to equip themselves with basic information about sexually transmitted infection (STI) and HIV, particularly, how these infections spread, how to protect oneself and the available treatment options.

Transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs)

If you are sexually active, you are at risk for STIs or HIV. These infections can be passed from one person to another through:

  • Unprotected sex (oral, vaginal or anal)
  • Sharing contaminated needles
  • From a mother to her baby during childbirth and breastfeeding
  • Contaminated blood transfusion or organ transplant
 


WHAT ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF A SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTION?

Most sexually transmitted infections do not have any signs or symptoms. But when they do appear, they can be:

  • Discharge from genital or anal area
  • Sores, blisters, growths or ulcers on genital areas
  • Rashes on palms or bottom of feet
  • Lower abdominal pain
  • Pain during sex or when passing urine

WHAT TESTS ARE RECOMMENDED FOR TRANSGENDER PERSONS?

  • HIV (once a year)
  • Chlamydia
  • Pap Smear
  • Syphilis
  • Hepatitis B
  • Trichomoniasis
  • Bacterial Vaginosis
  • HPV test
  • Gonorrhoea

You may wish to test more often (3 - 6 monthly) if you have multiple or anonymous sexual partners, have sex together with drug use or have sex with sexual partners that participate in these activities.

WHAT VACCINATIONS ARE RECOMMENDED?

  • Hepatitis B
  • HPV
Please refer here for more information on vaccinations offered by the DSC Clinic.

HOW DO I PROTECT MYSELF FROM SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS AND HIV?

  • Don’t have oral, vaginal or anal sex.
  • Be in a long term, mutually exclusive sexual relationship.
  • Use a condom every time you have oral, vaginal or anal sex.
  • Avoid sharing sex toys.
  • Be honest and open with your doctor about your sexual behavior so they can provide you with the best and most appropriate care.
  • Go for regular testing.
 

Screening & Vaccination
for MSM

Why do men who have sex with men need STI screening tests and vaccinations?

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) are found more frequently in men who have sex with men (MSM) than in other groups. For example, MSM seen in the DSC clinic are 25 times more likely to get Infectious syphilis, 4 times more likely to get Gonorrhoea and 1.5 times for more likely to get Chlamydia than other groups.

HIV is also more frequently found among MSM than in heterosexuals. Other viral STIs, like Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B and Herpes, also affect MSM more frequently. Most persons with STI have no symptoms at all. You can find out if you have an STI by having STI screening tests.

 
BLOOD
TEST
  • HIV
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • Herpes (HSV-1 and HSV-2)
  • Syphilis


URINE
SAMPLE
  • Chlamydia
  • Gonorrhoea
  • Throat Swap
  • Gonorrhoea
  • Anal Swab
  • Chlamydia


Even if you don’t have receptive anal sex, that is, being the “bottom” partner, you can still get these in the rectum through other activities like rimming and fingering.

If you present with symptoms, you may need other tests such as:

  • Urethra Swab
  • Ulcer Swab

If blood tests show you are not immune to hepatitis A or B, you should get vaccinated. Once youare immune to these you no longer need to include them in your STI screens.

* Hepatitis C should be tested if you are HIV positive or have ever injected recreational drugs.

** Herpes testing may be considered depending on your exposure and condition

Clinic for Men & Women

Men's Clinic

At DSC, our team of expert clinicians understands your needs and will help customise the appropriate tests that suits you.

Please click here for more information.

Women's Clinic

In DSC Clinic, we recognise the importance and need to offer our female patients a clinic specially dedicated to their care.

Please click here for more information.

 

DSC Guidebooks to STIs & Good Health

DSC Guidebooks to STIs & Good Health
Last updated on 15 May 2017